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Church Services

Church Services

1. On this page you will find the details of Church contacts.

2. Church services for the month within the Benefice.

3. The monthly news letter.

1.CHURCH CONTACT DETAILS

Priest-in-charge

During the vacancy can you please contact one of the Church Wardens or the Readers. Thank you.

Readers

Joy Galliers-Burridge 01279 444870

Roger Burridge 01279 444870

June Denton 01279 723714

Churchwardens

Sarah Bagnall 01279 441644

Michael Shaw - 01279 726792

Secretary

Christine Law - 01279 411646

Treasurer

Judith Denton 01279 723714

Safeguarding Officer:

Sarah Bagnall 01279 441644

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Benefice of High Wych and Gilston with Eastwick

Church website: stjameshighwych.org.uk

Facebook: eastwick and gilston church’s

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MARCH SERVICES

7th March

3rd Sunday of Lent

8.30am

BCP Holy Communion

St James, High Wych

 

 

9.30am

Family Service

St James, High Wych

 

 

 

 

 

14th March

4th Sunday of Lent

9.30am

Holy Communion

 

St James, High Wych

 

 MOTHERING SUNDAY

 

11.15am

Holy Communion

St Mary’s, Gilston

21st March

5th Sunday of Lent

9.30am

Holy Communion

St James, High Wych

28th March

PALM SUNDAY

9.30am

Holy Communion

St James, High wych

 

 

11.15am

Holy Communion

St Botolph’s,

Eastwick

 

 

 

Holy Communion

St James, High Wych

               March Letter 2021                                                                        

 Dear Friends,

As you drive into our villages some things are still the same. The sign by High Wych allotments telling you if you’re driving too fast, relatives still tending graves in the churchyards and the bin men still dutifully collecting our  refuge. Other things have changed. No lights on in our pubs. Village hall car parks  on a Saturday night empty of cars to take party revellers home. The school playground is eerily quiet.

I have just read Professor Tom Wright’s book called “God and the Pandemic” where he makes comparisons with the pandemic and the Second World War. Speaking about 1930s Germany, Pastor Martin Neimoller said: First they came for the Jews; but I did nothing because I am not a Jew. Then they came for the socialists, but I did nothing because I am not a socialist. Then they came for the Catholics, but I did nothing because I’m not a Catholic. Finally, they came for me, but by then there was no one left to help me.

 

 So in some way it may have been with the British and American reaction to the coronavirus. First it hit the Chinese, but we aren’t Chinese and China is a long way away and strange things (like eating pangolins) happen there. Then it hit Iran, but we didn’t worry because Iran, too, is far away, and anyway it’s such a very different place. Then it struck Italy, but we thought, Well, the Italians are sociable, tactile people, of course it will spread there, but we’ll be alright. And then it arrived in London and New York...And suddenly there was no safe space on the planet. Then there is that inevitable question of “Where is God in all this?”

At present I have the privilege of working in one of the vaccination centres in Harlow. From the window I can see the queue snaking round the car park and wonderful volunteer stewards supporting and encouraging in the freezing weather. It reminds me that the last time I stood in such a queue was at Heathrow Airport clutching my passport. Here the queue is a for a passport that mercifully you cannot buy with money and where humanity reaches out to give hopefully  a passport to life beginning with the most vulnerable. I am intrigued by the diversity of the queue. There are those with portable oxygen and indeed those who may have benefitted from the same followed by folk in their eighties sporting track suit and trainers who have run a couple of miles to reach their appointment. Others hide their faces from the advancing needle whilst a few want to watch the vaccine drawn up in case you are injecting them with some unknown substance. Jokers screech before being jabbed - unhelpful to the person behind who confides they have been awake all night worried about the anticipated event. The computer temporarily crashes and the slow forward momentum of the queue halts . A  man frustratingly remarks “Jesus Christ! Is this the queue?” No one  replies and no one answers back; after all it’s not as if we are queuing at Primark for the January Sales! This is a queue in which you obey the rules where we are aware there are many out there that would take our hallowed place. And  I think “Jesus why don’t you surprise him and the whole queue and answer him and say out loud “What bothers you my friend? You look upset – come and tell me all about it.”

Then a  95 year-old gentleman  trips over his walking stick as he hurries forward and falls smashing his  face and knee on the ground. No social distancing  now – humanity reaches forth to offer tissues for his bleeding nose  - someone removes their coat to pillow his head. The angry man stairs at the ground. Having mentioned your name on arrival, he does not realise that you are also in the queue and that you stand alongside each one of us sharing our day – loving us and wanting you to be part of our day even when we show no acknowledgement.

Finally to refer back to that question “Where is God in all this “ I conclude with the end of a poem written by  Malcolm Guite.

And where is Jesus this strange Eastertide?

He slips away from church, shakes off our linen bands

To don his apron with a nurse: he grips

And lifts a stretcher, soothes with gentle hands

The frail flesh of the dying, gives them hope,

Breathes with the breathless, lends them strength to cope.

On Thursdays we applauded, for he came

And served us in a thousand names and faces

Mopping our sick room floors and catching traces

Of that corona which was death to him:

Good Friday happened in a thousand places

Where Jesus held the helpless, died with them

That they might share his Easter in their need,

Now they are risen with him, risen indeed.

Janet Bellingham

SERVICES FOR JANUARY 2021

 3rd January

Second Sunday of Christmas The Epiphany

8.30am

BCP Holy Communion

St James, High Wych

 

 

9.30am

Family Service

St James, High Wych

 

 

 

 

 

10th January

The Baptism of Christ

 (1st Sunday of Epiphany)

9.30am

Holy Communion,

 

St James, High Wych

 

 

11.15am

Holy Communion

St Mary’s, Gilston

17th January

2nd Sunday of Epiphany

9.30am

Holy Communion

St James, High Wych

24th January

3rd Sunday of Epiphany

9.30am

Holy Communion

St James, High wych

 

 

11.15am

Holy Communion

St Botolph’s,

Eastwick

31st January

4th Sunday of Epiphany

(Candlemas)

9.30am

Holy Communion

St James, High Wych

                                                                                        

JANUARY 2021 LETTER

Hello friends

It is coming up to Christmas as I write this letter.  St James at High Wych have already had their Carol Service on the 13th of this month, the service was different to previous years, obviously no singing from the congregation, but the choir sang, and it was beautiful, the singing was the best I have every heard at St. James, so a big thank you.

The way we have all adapted and rearranged our lives to keep our families, friends and ourselves safe since last March is amazing.  We have managed to have church services in all three churches safely when permitted, and some have attended these.  Services have been streamed every week since the beginning of April.  We have had to adapt to much more technology in our lives by watching services in our own homes and have met people and have meetings via Zoom.

Now there is a light at the end of the tunnel and trusting in God to give us patience to wait until we have all been vaccinated, then we can think about a future where we can reach out and touch a loved one again.  
The High Wych village on the 12th lit up all the Christmas trees made in parking cones, that village and church people had made, it looks an absolute treat with the decorated trees twinkling away, there are so many trees, it must have taken many dedicated hours to assemble them, well done to everybody involved.  And as we looking at the trees Father Christmas passed by to give added excitement to the event.

Gilston and Eastwick are to have their Community Carol Service on the 20th December, it is to be an outside service around the War Memorial at Eastwick and it will be (or was depending when you receive your magazine) at 5.30pm.

We are PLANNING to have Christingle services again this year (2020), they will be different because of Covid 19 restrictions, but nevertheless there will be the Nativity story, carols (choir only) and Christingles.  By the time you read this, you will know if it all worked out or not. Times are 3pm and 5pm at both Gilston and High Wych churches on Christmas Eve.

The Bible stories through December and January are all very familiar to us, Mary and Joseph travelling from Nazareth to Bethlehem for a census, the birth of Jesus in a stable, the angel Gabrielle, telling the shepherds that a special baby had been born and to go and see him.  Then a bit later the wise men who followed a new star to its destination in Bethlehem, where they found the baby, born to be King of the Jews, and gave him gifts of gold, frankincense and myrrh.

Then we come to the part of the story that could easily be part of a modern-day thriller, The evil king Herod plotted to have the new born baby killed to protect his role as king.  Fortunately, Joseph was warned of his plot and took Mary and Jesus to Egypt and stayed there until Herod died, in the meantime Herod had all the baby boys killed trying to find Jesus but he failed to do so.  If you think the Bible is a boring read, try reading the first few chapters of Matthew, I am sure you will change your mind.

I do wish you all a very peaceful and happy Christmas, many of us will be celebrating Christmas alone or with very few others but staying safe and being patient is part of our lives for now, so let us look forward to a bright new healthy future in 2021, with lots to look forward to and friends and family to catch up with.

Love and blessing to you all,

Joy

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SERVICES FOR DECEMBER 2020

6th December

2nd Sunday of Advent

8.00am

BCP Communion

St James, High Wych

 

 

9.30am

Family Service

St James, High Wych

13th December

3rd Sunday of Advent

9.30

Holy Communion

St James, High Wych

 

 

11.15am

Holy Communion

St Mary’s Gilston

 

 

4.00pm

Community Carols

St James, High Wych

20th December

4th Sunday of Advent

9.30am

Holy Communion

St James, High Wych

 

 

5.30pm

COMMUNITY CAROLS IN GILSTON

DETAILS TO

FOLLOW ON LINE

24th December

THURSDAY

3.00PM

CHRISTINGALE

St James, High Wych

 

 

5.00PM

CHRISTINGALE

St James, High Wych

 

 

3.00PM

CHRISTINGALE

ST MARY’S GILSTON

 

 

5.00PM

CHRISTINGALE

ST MARY’S, GILSTON

 

 

11.30PM

Midnight Mass

St James, High Wych

25th December

CHRISTMAS DAY

9.30am

Christmas Day

Eucharist

St James, High Wych

 

 

11.15am

Christmas Day

Eucharist

St Mary’s, Gilston

27th December

1st Sunday of Christmas

9.30am

Holy Communion & Baptism

St James, High Wych

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                           December Letter 2020

Dear Friends,

Will Christmas be cancelled?

This year is definitely keeping us on our toes isn’t it.  When I wrote for the October magazine I had no idea that another lockdown was going to be introduced and once again the churches, like so many businesses and facilities would be closed.   As I sit to write to you today I have no idea if things will have changed by Christmas, or if the situation will have morphed into something different but equally challenging.

Many people, myself included struggle with losing the ability to plan, to have events or occasions to look forward to, and to fear that family and friends will be unable to gather as we have always done at this time of year.  But I know that my concerns are small in comparison to the daily challenges that others have experienced and continue to face this year.

So as I enter Advent, that time in the church calendar when we each reflect on our faith and prepare to meet the Christ child, I know that I need to look beyond my own irritations and potential disappointments to consider more closely what Jesus is calling us to do .

Jesus was a radical, a rule breaker, but he did respect the law (give to Caesar what is Caesars), he was not against those who ruled justly with care for others, but he called out those who misused their authority and abused their positions.  His ministry was to care for the poor, the outcast and marginalised, and he saw a society that had become unjust, selfish and uncaring.

As Christians we accept that we are to take on Christ’s ministry, and as such it is our turn to care for all of society, the poor, the marginalised, and the refugee, and to stand up and call out injustice and intolerance in all its many forms.  Today we are more aware than usual of communities near and far and individuals old and young, that are struggling. Loneliness for example can be crippling,  particularly in the winter when opportunities to see another human being are reduced further by darkness and poor weather, and now many are struggling with reduced incomes through furlough payments or reduced hours, and the fear of bills and putting food on the table creates stress and unhappiness.

At that very first Christmas, St Luke tells us that the angel Gabriel visited Mary to tell her she would bear a child and that child will be the Messiah for all people.   All people – one family, and when we remember that it feels easier to reach out to those in need.  It might be putting a card through the door of a neighbour with an invite to phone for a chat, or an offer to shop, or responding to a call for help from a charity. It might be contacting the local food bank to see if they need something you can help with, or making sure that you look out for anybody who seems quieter than normal or withdrawn. There are so many opportunities to show the love that Jesus came to tell us of in this difficult time, so when all else seems uncertain let us each show how constant and generous love can be.

Jesus was the first and greatest Christmas gift, and he asks us to be a gift to one another.  So whatever happens with our plans and arrangements, regardless if the church building is open or closed, Christmas will still happen. The love of God revealed through his son Jesus is eternal and we can all make his presence felt with the way that we show love to one another.

So, please look at our websites for details of our services which may be in the church or online or both, but most importantly I pray that each one of you knows the love of God this Christmas, and that you each have the opportunity to be a gift to the world.

Blessings     The Reverend Su Tarran

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